GRAMMAR 25: Have been living, have lived, lived

GRAMMAR 25: Have been living, have lived, lived

Hi Everybody!

Many English learners are confused with these two phrases –

  • I´ve been living here..
  • I´ve lived here…

When do we use one and another?

The answer is that we say “I´ve been living here..” when we focus on living, on the action itself. For example, ve been living here for six years and still haven’t lost my accent.

We say “I´ve lived here” when we focus on the result, and besides we still live there. For example, I´ve lived here for six years. I love it here.

Finally, if you don´t live there anymore, but want to highlight the period of your dwelling there, you say “I lived here for six years”.

Here is some more clarifying information about PPS and PPC from OxfordLearnersDictionaries web-site.

Present perfect simple vs present perfect continuous

We use the present perfect simple to focus on the result of an action, and we use the present perfect continuous to focus on the doing of the action itself.

  • I‘ve been practising this piece for weeks but still haven’t learned it.

We use the present perfect simple to talk about how much or how many. When we focus on how long something has taken, we use the present perfect continuous.

  • I‘ve done three tests this term.
  • We‘ve seen that show three times.
  • I‘ve been working on this project for a month now. I need to finish it by the end of the week.

We use the present perfect simple to talk about how many times something has happened. But we use the present perfect continuous for repeated actions when we don’t say specifically how many times they have happened. We often use phrases such as all day and recently in these sentences.

  • We‘ve seen that show three times.
  • I‘ve been trying to contact him all morning.

We usually use the present perfect simple, not the present perfect continuous, to talk about states rather than actions with verbs like behaveknowseem.

  •  We’ve known each other since university.We’ve been knowing each other since university.
  •  She’s had that laptop for over ten years!She’s been having that laptop for over ten years!

We often use the present perfect simple, not the present perfect continuous, to announce news for the first time.

  • Have you heard? Tom’s lost his job.
  • The Prime Minister has resigned.
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