GRAMMAR 3: MUST, HAVE TO, SHOULD

GRAMMAR 3: MUST, HAVE TO, SHOULD

Hello everyone! How are you this Wednesday? Today we are going to talk about different ways to express obligation or necessity. When do you have to use ‘must’? And ‘have to’? What is the difference between them? What is the meaning of ‘should’? How can you express prohibition? Here you have some keys. Go on and read this post!

OBLIGATION/ NECESSITY/ STRONG RECOMMENDATIONS

You use Must and Have to to express obligation or necessity. You can also use both of them in strong recommendations. Must and Have to have a very similar meaning but some slight differences.

 

Must

-It´s a modal verb and the only forms are ‘must’ or ‘musn´t’.

-It´s more common for specific (‘especially today’, ‘in this occassion’…) or personal obligations (subjective obligations).

-Examples:

I must buy a new coat -this one is too old now. (It´s my own decision)

I must stop smoking. (It´s my own decision)

You must see that film! It´s amazing! (Strong recommendation)

You absolutely must see him, however painful it may be for you.

You must be on time for class next Monday. There´s a test.

I must remember to phone my boyfriend tomorrow. It´s his birthday.

 

 

Have to

It´s a normal verb and it exists in all tenses.

It´s more common for general, external obligations (for example, rules and laws).

Examples:

I have to wear a tie and a jacket at work. (It´s a rule in this company).

You have to read that book. It´s fantastic! (Strong recommendation).

You have to wear a seatbelt in a car.

Do you have to work on Sundays?

I had to wear a uniform at my primary school.

I´ll have to get up early tomorrow. My interview is at 8.00.

I have to wear a red uniform. I´m a member of the Royal Guard.

 

 

NO OBLIGATION / NECESSITY

You use Don´t have to when there is no obligation/necessity.

-Examples:

You don´t have to pay for the tickets. They´re free.

You don´t have to come here everyday.

I don´t have to wear glasses anymore.

You don´t have to go to the concert if you don´t want to.

 

 

PROHIBITION

You use Musn´t (+ infinitive)

-You use it when something is prohibited, against the law.

-You can often use can´t or not allowed to instead of mustn´t.

Examples:

You mustn´t eat the cake. It´s for my birthday party!

You mustn´t touch that. It dangerous!

You musnt´t park here. It´s forbidden.

 

 

ADVICE OR OPINION

You use Should / Shouldn´t (+ infinitive)

-Should isn´t as strong as must or have to.

-We use it to say if we think something is the right or wrong thing to do.

-Should is a modal verb. The inly forms are should and shouldn´t.

-You can also use ought to and ought not to instead of should / shouldn´t.

Examples:

You should take warm clothes with you to Edinburgh. It might be cold at night.

I think the government should do something about the unemployment.

You should take an umbrella with you. It may rain tonight.

If you feel bad, you should stay in bed.

She´s always tired. She shouldn´t go to bed late every night.

People shouldn´t drive fast in the town centre.

You should eat some fruit or vegetables every day.

You should give up smoking. It´s bad for your health.

 

And that´s all for today. Do you have any doubts? If so, leave us a comment. Once more, thank you for visiting our blog!

 

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